About your Search

20121128
20121206
STATION
CSPAN 5
CNNW 4
FBC 2
MSNBCW 2
KGO (ABC) 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 16
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
the pentagon get a blank check while agencies that dispense aid to have to fight for every single nickel that they receive? why do we send and spend without restraint on wars and weapons and destroy life but we squeeze those programs that saved lives? for many years now, and you all heard me, this is my 443rd five-minute speech on this issue, for many years now i've been promoting the idea of smart security. smart security means protecting our interests, not with military force or by maintaining a massive nuclear arsenal, but by investing in development and diplomacy, through humanitarian assistance and partnerships around the world. at the aids conference in washington this past summer, there was a panel discussion on how in the struggle against hiv-aids we can do more with less. and what i want to know is, why do we have to settle for less when it comes to hiv-aids? this is a humanitarian crisis. our sense of moral deansency should be -- should compel us to invest whatever it takes to bring an end to it. it's not just the right thing, mr. speaker, it's the smart thing to do for our nat
. >> i was reporting from the comfort of the north lawn, the physis and the pentagon and a warehouse and it troops surged numbers. in new one and was about more of them while was reporting on. lou: your focus on this particular panel who, he targe of more than 225 individuals when. >> i work done for two and a half years in new will learn. it was a big project. every time i thought i was done, no, he need to talk to this guy. alternately and just said the stock because there will never be a time when i talked to everybody. lou: you were pursuing one of the toughest explanations of how those tend to be, and he the target. and it would been detected low will. >> pile was enough to hospital with my newborn son we want. of a corner of my eye and saw the story about the attack this coverage was all along the lines of, why would anybody put an outpost there. the chemistry that i needed to solve it. why would you put our troops in such a vulnerable position, but then it became partisan line to be so outnumbering. the stories suspect him remarkable. we cover the war among but we don't re
is suing the pentagon for its policy, banning women from direct combat roles. kai is in the newsroom with more on her legal moves. >> that's right. staff sergeant jennifer hunt is suing the department of defense, as the civil affairs specialist in the army affairs. hunt has deployed to iraq and afghanistan, even earned a purple heart. hunt says the policy bang women from direct ground missions is illegal. the department of defense says more than 14,000 jobs previously closed. two women have opened up to them this year. denise? >> all right. thank you, kai. hunt says this lawsuit isn't calling for a certain number of combat positions to be open to women. but instead to give women an equal opportunity to compete for the jobs. >>> in wjz's healthwatch, a new study could change the standard of care in breast cancer treatment. new research suggests women should take tamoxifen for 10 years. twice as long as the current five-year recommendation. researchers at the university of oxford found breast cancer patients who took the drug longer, were less l
with questions about unprecedented and some inappropriate access to classified information. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr spoke to the filmmakers. >> don't think she's a little young for the hard stuff? >> washington says she's a killer. >> it's a hollywood spy thriller with as much oscar buzz as it has controversy. "zero dark thirty," the story of the hunt for osama bin laden, from the oscar-winning powerhouse team of katherine big ga lo and mark bo, recreates how it all happened from the female cia analyst who finally figured out where he was hiding to the navy s.e.a.l.s who killed him. >> there are two narratives about the location of osama bin laden. >> reporter: the controversy? the obama administration has faced accusations it gave undeserved access to the filmmakers. in real life, everyone involved in the hunt for bin laden remains sworn to secrecy. but the filmmakers say they got firsthand accounts. they just won't say exactly how that happened. >> i think as a reporter you would understand we take prot t protecting our sources and sort of the exact methodology of our
brought all these cases to the attention of the pentagon. the secretary of the army responded with an assurance that our flag would be flown at army installations whenever the flags of the states are on display. and many of the individual installations i mentioned took corrective action when i contacted them. but despite this response, i continue to receive reports of situations where territorial flags are forgotten. see, the problem is there is no uniform regulation governing the inclusion of the flags of the district of columbia and the territories, though the secretary -- army secretary said it is the policy of the air force, the coast guards, the marines and the navy to let local commanders have the discretion to display state flags. with or without the flags of the territories on their installations. i have requested that the service modify their regulations to include our flags but no action has been taken. and i believe it should not be at the discretion of individual base commanders to decide to exclude any part of the united states. or the fighting men and women from
popular. if they want more entitlement cuts, more discretionary spending cuts, if they want pentagon cuts, the president wants them to specify them. and this offer is intended in part to say here's my math. here's the level of deficit reduction i can reach. if you think you can reach the same or more with more spending cuts, you go first and name them. >> yeah. >> so richard, we have everybody playing chicken for the most part. it's kabuki. you show your spending cuts and then i'll show mine. >> right. it failed before when the president was negotiating against himself. look, i'm going to come back. $400 billion of medicare cuts is exactly what you would want democrats to do if you want them to start dealing with entitlements. what are we talking about when we say democrats need to deal with entitlements? principally, it's medicare. so that's a huge down payment right there. you can say, well, i don't really believe they're possible, but that's a real proposal. what you're asking for in terms of the politics is that the president somehow solves john boehner's problems with his own caucus.
a little bit about that. barbara starr is cnn's pentagon correspondent. w. bell, a comedian who's the host of totally biased, and u.s. congresswoman ann hayworth is with us as well. barbara, what are the worrying signs? >> what our sources are telling us, soledad, last couple of days there have been new intelligence that the syrians are now moving their chemical weapons around in a very different way. not just consolidating for security purposes, but potentially moving them in a way that indicates they might be getting ready to use them. what do we mean by that? likelihood is what they're doing is using some of the chemical material closer or to the artillery shell dis --- >> separately -- to the actual weapons it's an indication you might be bringing them together. >> why else would you be doing that? and it is a massive concern right now. >> that has to be a major concern obviously in congress watching all of this that red line hillary clinton was talking about. >> well, absolutely. and we have obviously our major ally in the middle east, israel, is very vulnerable to this in syria. they
the sequester, that's good, less spending. i'm in favor of looking at the pentagon spending and reforming how you get it and get the same amount of dollars. look at the government spending. >> not a common republican position. >> more common than you think, but it's not common in the appropriations committee that does armed services. i talked to one of the key guys over there and said how can i help you reform the pentagon? there must have been -- >> i bet congressmen love getting that call, grover norquist, how can i help? >> i start meetings that way. want to make the government more efficient, make it cost less and we are everybody's friend on that subject. ralph nader and i were lobbying the bush administration back in 2001. >> what about the second cliff, the bush tax cuts? >> i think -- you get towards the end in a thing and if the republicans have played it right, they said look, push it out a month or two weeks so you should never actually go over these things, just as you do with continuing resolutions. say, look, give it a week, two months. >> the president is not going to extend. h
of rank. there's all sorts of money to be saved in the pentagon that will have no effect whatsoever on our defensive posture or our capability. >> but steve, i'm curious, though. what is the difference, in your opinion, between raising the top marginal rate and closing some loopholes? if you get $1.2 trillion in revenue, why does it matter so much more to the president that you do it by raising the top rate when the super wealthy, as we've described on the show, aren't going to be paying higher taxes? >> the issue is, joe, it's a question of whether it's going to be $800 billion or $1.2 trillion or somewhere in between. if the number ends up being $1.2 trillion, and we'll see where it comes out, it's hard to do it just with deductions. you end up limiting deductions so much that you cut into charities. you cut into state and local governments. you cut into a whole bunch of home mortgage. >> what about the buffett proposal? >> the buffett proposal is a great idea. the buffett proposal is a kind of no-brainer. >> how much does it raise? >> $160 billion over ten years. it's a piece of the puz
of defense, and continues that effort in the pentagon. it is also important that we use this to generate new thinking and new ideas for how best to carry this vital vision into the future. it is important to have this discussion because the program is at a critical inflection point. it has evolved from a focus on infrastructure in the soviet union to encompass a broader range across asia and africa and the middle east, and despite the success achieved in the former soviet union, this program remains as critical as ever and maintains a strong support of leadership. it also has the strong support of our special guest today. we are honored to serve in his cabinet and honored to introduce. president obama has been a leader in reducing the threat of weapons of mass destruction. he has been a leader since he joined the united states senate and partner closely with senator dick lugar. as president, he has set a visionary agenda and to achieve a world without nuclear weapons and has taken practical steps to move the world in that direction. he has helped renew america's global leadership, and he has
american service women are suing the pentagon, hoping to force the military to drop its policy that excludes women from thousands of ground combat positions. all four are veterans of the wars in iraq and afghanistan. two have been awarded the purple heart. they maintain that the exclusion rule is discriminatory. >> i would be assigned positions based on my gender rather than my qualifications. it didn't make sense for me personal personally or professionally and it doesn't make sense for the military. >> a dangerous set of rule that is prevent commanders deciding the best way to fight. >>> yahoo!'s new ceo is headed to the white house to discuss the fiscal cliff with the president. her new gig and her new son have been full of surprises. >> baby has been easy. the baby has been way easier than everyone made it out to be. i think i've been really lucky that way. i had a very easy, healthy pregnancy. he has been easy. so those have been two really terrific surprises. the kids have been easier and the job has been fun. >> mayer says her secret to getting everything done is ruthles
to the pentagon and domestic programs and tax increases automatically go into effect. after the meeting, the finger-pointing came quickly. republicans say democrats aren't bringing to the table a plan that include significant cuts to medicare and entitlement programs. >> revenue was only on the table. if they were serious. spending cuts. >> the white house drew its own line in the sand and said tax rates must go up on the top earners, but -- >> the middle-class tax cut should be made permanent. >> president obama stayed out of the fiscal cliff discussions and sat down for lunch with former rival mitt romney. >> i am sure they will or have already compared experiences on the campaign trail. >> today president obama hits the road to push for his plan to avoid the fiscal cliff. but republicans have slammed him for campaign-style politics that they say just won't get the job done. rob and sunny, back to you. >> can you really imagine that they're not going to reach some sort of deal to avoid the fiscal cliff? i mean that would be so unpopular across the nation. >> you would -- if you can ta
the money, but we could transfer responsibilities out of the pentagon and consolidate programs and save a significant amount of money. >> this weekend, you can talk with oklahoma senator tom coburn about the fiscal cliff and the future of the republican party. the senator has written several books and reports. join our three-hour conversation with your calls, e-mails, tweets, and facebook comments for medical doctor, author, and senator tom coburn. >> he worked his way up, went to harvard law school, and at the urging of one of his brothers, emigrated out west to illinois. he arrived after about a month's journey by ship, by stagecoach, by train, and arrived on a steamboat in this muddy mining town, board himself in a log cabin, established a law practice, and slowly worked his way up and became a very successful lawyer and then got involved politically, ran for congress, served for eight terms, and then defended abraham lincoln, obviously, from illinois, and then ulysses s. grant. as they were on the rise, washburne stated them is very close colleagues. after grant was elected presiden
the pentagon bio fuels program. the defense bill has always had bi-partisan support. this time, it passed unanimously 98 to zero. we will be right back. who watch our show to be able to come away armed with facts and the arguments to feel confident in their positions. i want them to have the data and i want them to have the passion. but it's also about telling them that you're put on this planet for something more! i want this show to have an impact beyond just informing. an impact that gets people to take action for themselves. as a human being that's really important. this is not just a spectator sport. [ music ] >> broadcasting across the nation on your radio and on current tv this is "the bill press show". >> president obama tells bloomberg news one more time, there will be no deal unless tax rates go up for the wealthiest of americans. what do you say? hello, everybody. and a great big wednesday morning to you. great to see you this morning. it is the full court press coming to you live from our nation's capitol here on washington d.c. keeping our eye on what's goi
, quote, worrying signs of activity in syria, just in the past couple of days. pentagon correspondent barbara star, we're so happy to thank, is with us in studio this morning. barbara, great to see you. so the white house apparently hasn't revealed any new evidence that the syrian government is planning to deploy these weapons. >> what are we talking about here? they're not revealing it publicly but in fact there has been intelligence over the last couple of days that the syrians are moving their chemical weapons inventory around. and it's quite different. in the past we've seen them moving it around to store it essentially, make it more secure, as fighting's gotten closer. this time all of our sources are telling us, it is telling us, it is different. that what they are seeing is movement that could potentially signal the use of chemical weapons. this typically would be matching up the chemical with preparing it with a warhead. with artillery. with rockets. all the signs that they could be getting ready for an attack. very worrying. a lot of international pressure in the last several
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)